American Morning

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April 7th, 2010
09:15 PM ET

The Teaser

"The Teaser” is a preview of the guests we have lined up for the next day – so you know when to tune in (and when to set your alarm!). Guests and times are always subject to change.

We are continuing our coverage of the West Virginia mine explosion, with our own John Roberts on the scene.

In addition, we have the following guests:

5:45AM We are starting early with live coverage of the START signing ceremony. Michael Levi, Senior Fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and author, "On Nuclear Terrorism" will analyze.

7:30AM  Jeff Biggers, grandson of a miner and author of "Reckoning at Eagle Creek: The Secret Legacy of Coal in the Heartland" will give us an inside look at coal mining communities and how they handle these tragedies.

7:40AM & 8:40AM  Roughly one year after he was held by pirates, Captain Richard Phillips reveals new details about his ordeal. We'll also get his thoughts on the latest pirate attacks off of Somalia.

8:30AM  Luke Gelinas' 17-year-old son was tutored by Phoebe Prince and knew her bullies. He'll tell us what went wrong – and how the community can move forward.

Got questions for any of our guests?
Tweet 'em at Twitter.com/amFIX or post them below and we'll try to use 'em!


Filed under: The Teaser
April 7th, 2010
02:22 PM ET

Afghan women: Don't exclude our men

World Vision International launched a project in Afghanistan to train midwives to curb the staggering infant mortality rate in the country.

World Vision International launched a project in Afghanistan to train midwives to curb the staggering infant mortality rate in the country.

By Carol Costello, CNN

(CNN) – In a place where women have few rights, it seems improbable women would plead for men's advancement too. But, it's happening in Afghanistan.

Not for the reasons you might think, but because many Afghan women realize without the support of fathers, brothers and uncles, they will remain second-class citizens.

For years, the United States has developed and funded special "women's only" programs to help women start their own small businesses.

And while those efforts have been greatly appreciated, some global women's groups wonder if these programs are as effective as they could be when it comes to achieving equality in a patriarchal society.

More disturbingly, some other women's groups say these efforts, if not done well, may actually endanger women.

"Women are put at greater risk of violence when they must return home to frustrated, unemployed husbands who don't understand why their wives are getting training and credit and they are not," says Ritu Sharma, president of Women Thrive Worldwide.

It's time, says Sharma, to look at helping Afghan women in a more inclusive way – and that means including brothers and husbands – as well as sisters and wives.

"Gender is about looking at the different roles ... that men and women have in their families ... and then designing projects that meet everyone's needs."

FULL POST


Filed under: Afghanistan • Women's Rights
April 7th, 2010
09:00 AM ET

Trapped miners don't respond to rescuers

(CNN) – A bore hole was drilled early Wednesday into the area of a West Virginia coal mine where four miners, unaccounted for following an explosion Monday, are expected to be found, Gov. Joe Manchin said.

Pipes were lowered into the hole, and officials banged on the pipes in an effort to contact those underground, but there was no response, Manchin said.

The hole punched through about 4:15 a.m. ET, the governor said. Two more holes were under way, and a fourth is planned.

"There's a sliver of hope, but we know that the odds are not in our favor," West Virginia Gov. Joe Manchin told CNN.

"Everyone's going to cling to the hope of a miracle," he told reporters. "That is the true agony of this."

One drill bore down 1,100 feet to open a 6-inch hole in a ceiling of the mine, said Chris Adkins, CEO of Massey Energy Co., owner of the Upper Big Branch South Mine where Monday's fatal blast occurred.

Keep reading this story »


Filed under: Top Stories
April 7th, 2010
08:00 AM ET

Teens plead not guilty in bully case

(CNN) – Three teens accused in the bullying of a Massachusetts high school student who committed suicide pleaded not guilty to related charges Tuesday.

Sean Mulveyhill, 17, Kayla Narey, 17, and Austin Renaud, 18, were not present at Hampshire Superior Court. They entered their pleas through their lawyers. Our Alina Cho has the report.

Read more: 3 teens charged in Massachusetts bullying case plead not guilty


Filed under: Crime
April 7th, 2010
05:49 AM ET

LIVE Blog: Chat with us during the show

Editor's Note: Welcome to American Morning's LIVE Blog where you can discuss the "most news in the morning" with us each and every day. Join the live chat during the program by adding your comments below. It's your chance to share your thoughts on the day's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules: 1) Keep it brief 2) No writing in ALL CAPS 3) Use your real name (first name only is fine) 4) No links 5) Watch your language (that includes $#&*).

The deaths of 25 workers in a West Virginia coal mine have turned a spotlight on the safety record of the mine's owner, which has paid record fines for safety violations.

The deaths of 25 workers in a West Virginia coal mine have turned a spotlight on the safety record of the mine's owner, which has paid record fines for safety violations.

Fatal mine accident sparks scrutiny of owner's record

(CNN) – The deaths of at least 25 workers in a West Virginia coal mine this week have turned a harsh spotlight on the safety record of the mine's owner, which has paid record fines for safety and environmental violations.

Virginia-based Massey Energy Co. has racked up millions of dollars in penalties in recent years. The Montcoal, West Virginia, mine where Monday's fatal explosion took place received 458 citations from federal inspectors in 2009, and more than 50 of those were for problems that the operators knew about but had not corrected, according to federal mine safety records.

CEO defends mine's record Video

The federal Mine Safety and Health Administration hit the company with nearly $900,000 in fines in 2009 and has sought more than $100,000 in the first quarter of 2010. Inspectors cited the operators more than 100 times in the first quarter of 2010, including six times for "unwarrantable failure" to correct violations. FULL STORY

Mass. teens arraigned in Prince bullying-death

Three more Massachusetts high school students accused in the bullying-death of Phoebe Prince will be arraigned today. Yesterday, three others pleaded "not guilty." In all, as many as nine teens could face charges from statutory rape to stalking. Prosecutors say their relentless abuse led to 15-year-old Prince's suicide. Our Alina Cho has the report from the courthouse in Northhampton, Massachusetts. FULL STORY

Doctors who deny addicts in danger

You have seen the headlines from stars like Heath Ledger to Michael Jackson, but America's pill problem is growing in places far away from the spotlight. A new study says prescription drug overdoses were up by two thirds, from 1999 to 2006. Today in our series "Addicted," Carol Costello shows us it can be deadly, not only for the addict, but for the doctor who comes between the addict and his fix. FULL STORY

Sound off: We want to hear from you this morning. Add your comments to the LIVE blog below and we'll read some of them on the show.


Filed under: LIVE Blog • Top Stories