American Morning

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April 9th, 2010
02:00 PM ET

We Listen – Your comments 4/9/10

Editor's Note: Friday’s American Morning audience defended Tiger Woods’ return to golf, noting their disinterest in his personal life, but great desire to watch him play at the Masters in August, GA.

  • William: Tiger Woods........ Carol, love 'ya dearly, but on this issue you are WRONG, WRONG, WRONG ! Do you really think that golfers & Golf Fans sit around reading Gossip Mags (Rags) ? No, they want to see the best golfer perform his stuff on the links...That's where the interest lies.....
  • Donald: ...I just simply don't understand what all this interest about Tiger's sex life is about. Sure, he's a lousy husband; but what does that have to do with his sporting ability? People argue he's a role model. He's not. He's a multi-million dollar athlete paid to do what he's good at. His marital woes should have absolutely nothing to do with his job-which he does very well. It's NOT OUR BUSINESS!!!
  • Dorothy: I don't play golf and never watch golf tournaments, and I tuned in only because I think Tiger Woods is repulsive. Amazed!

What do you think? Has the Tiger Woods scandal made him more or less popular? Continue the conversation below.


Filed under: We Listen
April 9th, 2010
10:00 AM ET

An instrument of change for one Harmonica player

Bradley Harrison risked everything to make his dream of owning a harmonica factory come true.
Bradley Harrison risked everything to make his dream of owning a harmonica factory come true.

By Katherine Wojtecki, CNN

ROCKFORD, IL (CNN) – “It's the coolest instrument in the world. You can put it in your pocket you can carry it around... it’s a real musical instrument.”

For Bradley Harrison, that musical instrument – the harmonica – became an instrument of change in his own life.

After picking one up at a house party 14 years ago, Harrison decided to leave his job as a restaurant manager to pursue his new passion. With no formal business training and only a high school education he risked everything to make his dream a reality.

“I think they thought I was a pipe dreamer. And that can either destroy you or make you even more determined and it made me more determined to prove everyone wrong.”

Risking it all for a perfect harmonica Video

With that determination, Harrison commuted 90 miles each way, maxed out five credit cards and even slept on the floor in his office.

“I'd work until 2 a.m. and I went to the local store and I bought a sleeping bag and I'd sleep here. I know it sounds sad its not but at the time I was living the high life, so it's all how you look at it.”

Then the economy took a turn for the worse.

FULL POST


Filed under: Living
April 9th, 2010
09:00 AM ET

Divided over Confederate history

(CNN) – It started when Virginia's Governor, Bob McDonnell, reinstated April as Confederate History Month in his state. But during his announcement, the governor failed to make any mention of the word "slavery."

He has apologized, calling slavery "evil and inhumane," but that hasn't stopped the controversy. Matthew Whitworth, a student at Virginia Commonwealth University, supports observing Confederate History Month. He joined us on Friday's American Morning, along with Iman Shabazz, vice chairman for the Richmond Peace Education Center, who's against it.

Read more: Gov. McDonnell apologizes for omitting slavery in Confederacy proclamation


Filed under: Controversy
April 9th, 2010
07:00 AM ET

Teen turns escape from pain into charity

By Allie Brown, CNN

Alpharetta, Georgia (CNN) - A disease that Mackenzie Bearup compares to a bomb going off in her knee prompted the 16-year-old to seek escape in the comfort of reading. Now she's helping thousands of troubled children soothe their own pain - within the pages of donated books.

"When I read, it's a real escape," Bearup says. "I try to take myself into the book instead of in the real world where I'm in so much pain."

Her personal discovery that books could be used to ease discomfort was an idea that Bearup ultimately chose to share with homeless and abused children throughout the country.

Bearup's journey began six years ago when she was jumping on a bed and dancing to TV's "American Idol." Suddenly her knee started "hurting unexplainably, extremely bad," she recalls. The next day, the fifth grader's knee swelled to the size of a grapefruit. After a week on crutches, it was even worse. Her knee collapsed when she tried to walk. FULL STORY

Do you know a hero? Nominations are open for 2010 CNN Heroes


Filed under: CNN Heroes
April 9th, 2010
06:00 AM ET

Avlon: Ugliness & absurdities in American politics continue

Editor’s note: John P. Avlon is a senior political columnist for The Daily Beast and author of the new book "Wingnuts: How the Lunatic Fringe is Hijacking America." Previously, he served as chief speechwriter for New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani and was a columnist and associate editor for The New York Sun.

CNN Independent analyst John Avlon says Virginia's governor resuscitated more than a century’s worth of bad feeling and distrust by not mentioning slavery.
CNN Independent analyst John Avlon says Virginia's governor resuscitated more than a century’s worth of bad feeling and distrust by not mentioning slavery.

By John Avlon, Special to CNN

This week’s wingnuts include Virginia’s governor issuing a Confederate History proclamation that ignored slavery and a Georgia congressman confessing his fears that Guam might tip over.

The ugliness and absurdities in American politics continue, but they were belied this week by a moment of grace from a conservative senator who stood up to his audience’s expectations by complimenting Speaker Nancy Pelosi and standing up for civility. He gets our Profile in Courage Award for the week.

Virginia’s newly elected Gov. Bob McDonnell managed to resuscitate more than a century’s worth of bad feeling and distrust by deciding to issue a Confederate History Month proclamation – without mentioning slavery. It was a doubly odd decision, apparently made with an eye toward scoring subtle political points with “heritage, not hate” home state conservatives. The proclamation had been suspended by the two previous Democratic governors, Mark Warner and Tim Kaine. But the previous GOP Gov. Jim Gilmore had inserted language excoriating the evils of slavery into the proclamation.

McDonnell and/or someone on his staff apparently thought it would be a good idea to not only re-open that wound, but also made the proactive decision to remove any mention of slavery – not that slavery had anything to do with the Civil War in the first place. This neo-Confederate hat-tip did not go unnoticed and by Wednesday night McDonnell was offering voluminous apologies, but little by way of explanation.

FULL POST


Filed under: Opinion • Politics • Wingnuts of the week
April 9th, 2010
06:00 AM ET

LIVE Blog: Chat with us during the show

Editor's Note: Welcome to American Morning's LIVE Blog where you can discuss the "most news in the morning" with us each and every day. Join the live chat during the program by adding your comments below. It's your chance to share your thoughts on the day's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules: 1) Keep it brief 2) No writing in ALL CAPS 3) Use your real name (first name only is fine) 4) No links 5) Watch your language (that includes $#&*).

Tiger Woods during the first round of the 2010 Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club.
Tiger Woods during the first round of the 2010 Masters Tournament at Augusta National Golf Club.

Tiger Woods: Why do we care?

(CNN) – Tiger Woods came roaring back yesterday after five straight months of scandal.

After his best first-round at the Masters ever, Tiger's two shots off the lead and his seemingly adoring fans are following his every move at Augusta National.

But is it his golf game we care about so much? Our Carol Costello will join us live with some insight. She's asking the question, "Tiger Woods: Why do we care?" Read more

Should Virginia observe Confederate History Month?

It started when Virginia's Governor, Bob McDonnell, reinstated April as Confederate History Month in his state. But during his announcement, the governor failed to make any mention of the word "slavery."

He's apologized, calling slavery "evil and inhumane," but that hasn't stopped the controversy. Matthew Whitworth, a student at Virginia Commonwealth University, supports observing Confederate History Month. He'll join us this morning along with Iman Shabazz, vice chairman for the Richmond Peace Education Center, who's against it. Read more

Sound off: We want to hear from you this morning. Add your comments to the LIVE blog below and we'll read some of them on the show.


Filed under: LIVE Blog • Top Stories
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