American Morning

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May 6th, 2010
05:48 AM ET

LIVE Blog: Chat with us during the show

Editor's Note: Welcome to American Morning's LIVE Blog where you can discuss the "most news in the morning" with us each and every day. Join the live chat during the program by adding your comments below. It's your chance to share your thoughts on the day's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules: 1) Keep it brief 2) No writing in ALL CAPS 3) Use your real name (first name only is fine) 4) No links 5) Watch your language (that includes $#&*).

Faisal Shahzad made a practice run in Manhattan the day before he allegedly tried to blow up a car bomb in Times Square, according to a law enforcement source with knowledge of his questioning.

Faisal Shahzad made a practice run in Manhattan the day before he allegedly tried to blow up a car bomb in Times Square, according to a law enforcement source with knowledge of his questioning.

Source: Bomb suspect made dry run

(CNN) – Faisal Shahzad made a practice run in Manhattan the day before he allegedly tried to blow up a car bomb in Times Square, according to a law enforcement source with knowledge of his questioning.

Last Friday, Shahzad drove his white Isuzu from Connecticut through Times Square, where he staked out potential locations for the following night's planned attack, the source said. He then parked the Isuzu several blocks away from Times Square, though the precise location was unclear, and took a train back to Connecticut, the source said.

Separately, authorities in Pakistan have rounded up a number of people for questioning, as U.S. law enforcement officials sought Wednesday to piece together Shahzad's actions and motivations.

Iftikhar Mian, the father-in-law of the suspect, and Tauseef Ahmed, Shahzad's friend, were picked up in Karachi, Pakistan, on Tuesday, two intelligence officials said. Read more

The Phoenix Suns wear 'Los Suns' jerseys on Cinco de Mayo in response to an immigration law recently passed in Arizona.

The Phoenix Suns wear 'Los Suns' jerseys on Cinco de Mayo in response to an immigration law recently passed in Arizona.

Should athletes play politics? Ariz. immigration debate hits MLB & NBA

The world of politics is colliding with the world of sports over Arizona's controversial new immigration law. Last night, there were more protests at the Arizona Diamondbacks' game and the Phoenix Suns took to the court wearing jerseys reading "Los Suns," showing team solidarity with Latinos.

Politicians like former New Mexico Governor Bill Richardson are debating the law, not just here on CNN, but also on ESPN. And both the controversy and the overlap with sports came up during President Obama's remarks about Cinco de Mayo.

The question this morning – should basketball or baseball, or any sport for that matter, get involved in politics? Our Carol Costello wants to know. Sound off below.

Sound off: We want to hear from you this morning. Add your comments to the LIVE blog below and we'll read some of them on the show.


Filed under: LIVE Blog • Top Stories
soundoff (110 Responses)
  1. American Morning

    Thanks for all the comments, we read a bunch of them on the show. See you back here tomorrow!

    May 6, 2010 at 9:05 am |
  2. mj

    This isn't about "politics". This is about discrimination and the fundamental rights of citizens of this country. The media seems to relegate many important issues to "politics", thereby making an excuse for the outright lies, discrimination and racist fearmongering that has been exhibited to a nauseating degree since the last election.
    I applaude the Phoenix Suns' stand for the right of people to not be discriminated against. If corporations and their lobbyists can get involved in what happens in this country, then so can they!

    May 6, 2010 at 8:58 am |
  3. Ann

    I can't believe this is even a question. To support illegal immigration is just unbelievable to me. You have NO constitutional rights if you are not a legal citizen of this country. I can not believe our President supports the illegal immigrants in this country. And I am appaled that any team in this country would be showing support for what is not legal. If the citizens of this country would come together the way the illegal's do, we could change our country. We won't have one to defend if Mexico has taken over! Remember Patrick Henry?

    May 6, 2010 at 8:58 am |
  4. Pauly

    It's deplorable that so many think the US Constitution only applies to them when in fact, it protects all Americans. In fact, parts of it protects anyone & everyone in this country! You can't support the Constitution by allowing certain individuals or groups to be denied the same rights that you enjoy!!!

    May 6, 2010 at 8:58 am |
  5. Kathleen

    Sport teams have made their fortunes off Americans and should be supporting laws designed to protect us. By not doing so they contribute to the anarchy that has resulted from the presence of millions of illegal aliens in this country.

    Instead of supporting those who protest such laws, the Suns should have Jesse Jackson, Al Sharpton, and Phil Gordon sew on the back of the players' shirts the names of Rob Krentz and some of the hundreds of thousands of other Americans who have been the victims of violent crimes committed by illegal aliens.

    May 6, 2010 at 8:57 am |
  6. Keith Farley

    I am not against social commentary by sports figures as long as it is informed commentary.
    The truth is that a lot of people have spoken out against the SB 1070 before knowing what it is about. It does not give the police the right to stop someone because the look Hispanic, they have to have a reason, such a a broken headlight, then they could ask anyone. The police need this authority because of the criminal element in the illegals, about 30% are hardened criminals, drug trafficking, rapists, murders, thieves and some of the illegals smuggled across are from the orient and the Middle East so it is a huge security risk.
    Before every screams about their civil rights, the non-citizens, what about ours, the citizens of this country! Where was everyone when a rancher was killed in southern Arizona and they found tracks leading back into Mexico, Where were his rights?
    Keith Farley

    May 6, 2010 at 8:51 am |
  7. Shawn Ogan

    Marketing, Money, Publicty, Huge new fan base!!!!!

    May 6, 2010 at 8:50 am |
  8. MSA-TX

    Asking whether a US athlete (or anyone else, for that matter) should chime in on an inhumane & unconstitutional law is like asking whether a passing doctor should help a dying man on the street.

    A comment by Sherri, read out loud on American Morning:
    "Baseball players have a job to do. That job does not include political debate."

    The athletes & other celebrities speaking out on this issue aren't debating anything - they're simply making a statement about what's morally & constitutionally just - AND they're getting their jobs done. I'm not just entertained, I'm also proud to see that not all celebrities are oblivious to some of the very real human problems our country is facing.

    May 6, 2010 at 8:50 am |
  9. Ronny

    Anybody that is opposed to controlling/stopping the invasion of illegal aliens is wishing for / desiring of / hoping for / assisting in the destruction of America.

    End of.

    May 6, 2010 at 8:49 am |
  10. John Clauer

    It is amazing that Tim Tebow is banned from putting messages in the black cammo paint under his eyes that express his Christian worldview and the media seems to support this type of PC ban on free speech. However, the Suns support people who have broken the law and are in the United States illegally and the commentators on CNN think this is OK. This whole issue boils down to your basic worldview...if you are a Naturalist and believe there is no Created order, you support human rights over the rule of law and good of the common community. If you are a Theist and believe in absolute truth, you support the rule of law that reflects "truth" and "just" laws that protect the rights of common community. There is a fine line between suppression of freedom and enforcement of the law...but in my opinion this Arizona law is fair.

    May 6, 2010 at 8:49 am |
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