American Morning

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May 31st, 2011
05:53 AM ET

Question of the Day: Should energy drinks be regulated?

Energy drinks are popular among kids but they could pose health risks and provide no therapeutic benefit, a report by American doctors published in the journal Pediatrics says. The large amount of caffeine in such drinks, as well as other stimulant substances, could have negative effects on growing children.

American Morning is asking what you think this morning in our Question of the Day: Should energy drinks be regulated?

Let us know what you think here. Your response could be read on American Morning.


Filed under: AM Asks
soundoff (31 Responses)
  1. richard howard

    Not gonna happen.

    May 31, 2011 at 4:13 pm |
  2. richard howard

    How does it hurt. Let them have no food or drink.thiS will cut down on all time consuming non Educational excercise programs.

    May 31, 2011 at 4:11 pm |
  3. Bernard

    No, parents need to get kids out of the house and off that BUTT playing computer playing games, just you wait and see, American kids will soon be know globally to be overweight and lazy

    May 31, 2011 at 3:21 pm |
  4. Charles Thomas Wild

    For a look at – the real deal – what the old medicine, caffeine (100 mg), really does (positive fashion) to the ability to pay attention for an adult with ADHD Inattentive, try: http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/Tartrazine_and_ADHD/ (Modern nutrition) – ADHD – A Clearer View (not a cure) – http://health.groups.yahoo.com/group/ADHD_Bulletin_Board/message/46812 – Can some beverage labels be improved by different wording? Yes.

    May 31, 2011 at 11:52 am |
  5. cj cook

    What ever happened to parents? Personal responsibility? Maybe the government should tuck me in at night and hold my hand so the big bad monsters don't get me. The nanny state is alive and well. Bush, Obama, it doesn't matter.

    This country is doomed.

    May 31, 2011 at 11:30 am |
  6. Adam

    I am 25 and I drink several energy drinks a week and have been for years. I do not have any side effects from this because I know how to handle moderation. It is up to the parents to handle this for their children; though I do not believe kids need extra energy as is. I do think companies should be required to list all ingredients and the amounts of each. That way people can do their own research and make up their own minds about what they want to put in their bodies.

    May 31, 2011 at 10:53 am |
  7. wetfuse13485

    If you read every doctors report about things that are not good for you. Moderation is key to all of their problems. Energy Drinks is not the problem, the amount that a person consumes can be the problem. We do not banned fatty foods and it is a problem that we have in this country with the waistlines.

    US NAVY RETIRED
    5326 (SO / S.E.A.L.) 21 YRS OF MILITARY SERVICE

    May 31, 2011 at 9:34 am |
  8. slider

    Nanny State of America

    May 31, 2011 at 9:14 am |
  9. Samantha

    Are people really this stupid? Energy drinks need to be watched carefully. Parents should watch the amount that kids drink. I am a high school student myself, and it's tough. With the homework assignments we're given plus the extra classes at college, or even sports, it's hard to be awake in class during the day. I have one every other week on a day that I need it most! This is what parents need to do if they're worried about their kids and energy drinks

    May 31, 2011 at 8:58 am |
  10. Bryan L.

    Companies will create and sell anything to make a buck. The lack of transparency regarding how those products affect humans means they can get away with foisting dangerous products on consumers for many years. Their marketing and their own "medical experts" counter real research with fake and thus obscure the facts even more. Without oversight, we all get fed an unhealthy diet of bad products from cigarettes to overly sweetened/salty/fat food from manufacturers and then we get addicted before we find out the truths about the products.

    Meanwhile the companies and their investors are reaping the profits. Without government oversight, capitalism only works for the seller once only one side of the buy/sell relationship has accurate information about the transaction.

    May 31, 2011 at 8:24 am |
  11. Jami

    Why do kids need energy drinks at all... gov't regulated or not? Their bodies produce so much energy normally, what's the point? It's a ridiculous argument. Parents should do their jobs so government can focus on... let's see... oh yeah, THEIR jobs.

    May 31, 2011 at 8:16 am |
  12. Michelle

    When i graduated from High School two years ago, i was taking advanced classes, working part time. planning a wedding, attending military training, and turning my home work in on time while maintaining a 3.75 gpa. All without a single red bull. For medical reasons alone, there is no reason for any teen to have an energy drink. It doesn't matter what the goverment does, teens will always find a way to purchase what's illegal for them. It's up to parents to teach and regulate for themselves to thier own children.

    May 31, 2011 at 8:13 am |
  13. Chris fallon

    Parents cannot be expected to regulate their children when outside of the home so these drinks should be regulated to help parents enforce what they are doing in the home. Furthermore these drinks are not "energy" they are loaded with caffeine and sugar so, these are unhealthy and do nothing more then act as a stimulant to your system. Along with all these power drinks like gator aid and power aid they are loading themselves with sodium and potassium possibly altering their levels in the body which may lead to cardiac arrhythmias.

    May 31, 2011 at 8:07 am |
  14. Crazy in Omaha

    Energy Drinks per se should be BANNED. Caffeine is a dangerous stimulant, especially in the doses that are in those drinks. Long term useage results in problems in seratonin levels in the brain. The caffeine depletes the seratonin by acting very much like cocaine does. Then the depression & manic episodes set in. Ban those drinks. Vitamins, yes, caffeine, NO.

    May 31, 2011 at 7:59 am |
  15. Clifford Collier

    RIGHT!
    The government can't regulate the things it should(eggs, and the other recalls) how can we expect any thing but the standard mistakes as usual.
    Close the barn door after the cows leave!!!

    May 31, 2011 at 7:30 am |
  16. joe dieringer

    My kids are very active. They play soccer and swim nearly every day. They lose so many electorlytes from sweat that I encourage sports drinks. However, I buy either sugar free or reduced sugar.

    May 31, 2011 at 7:26 am |
  17. Jenni Siri

    I'm more worried about the corn syrup in sports drinks than the caffeine. I think energy drinks with corn syrup should be taken off of the market entirely as well as all other products that use sweeteners derived from corn. They are now saying that rise in childhood diabetes coincides with the use of corn syrup as a sweetener in our foods and drinks.

    May 31, 2011 at 7:26 am |
  18. Tod Hale

    You shouldn't feed your kid sticks of butter, should that be regulated?
    Let's face it, parents are increasingly detached from many things in a 13 y.o.'s life, and that includes the diet.

    May 31, 2011 at 7:25 am |
  19. Marvin

    People scream about the government having too much say in our lives, and then they want the same government to take over those tasks that they should do as parents. It's simply ludicrous!

    May 31, 2011 at 7:03 am |
  20. Curtis duncan

    Try the AmwayGlobal energy drinks...powered by the Vitamin B12 complex...and only 8 CALORIES ! Do a little mor research on this before you go busting out on Energy Drinks-Please. CDD

    May 31, 2011 at 6:56 am |
  21. Jenni Siri

    I think energy drinks with corn syrup should be taken off of the market entirely as well as all other products that use sweeteners derived from corn. Many kids diagnosed ADHD are probably just responding to corn syrup. That was the case with my son. I did a test and found that he could eat candy and ice cream sweetened with regular white sugar (Hershey's and Breyers) with no reaction at all. However, he could NOT eat anything sweetened with corn sweeteners without becoming very hyper and overly emotional, ie, angry, crying, banging off the walls excited etc...

    I've also read that the rise in childhood diabetes coincides with the rise of corn syrup in our foods. I would also be curious to know if they are doing any tests to see if the rise in autism isn't somehow related to corn syrup too. They use it in most of our foods, drinks and desserts now because it's cheaper... but at what cost to our children?

    May 31, 2011 at 6:50 am |
  22. Marco Lima

    I agree with Jesse Clark say because just parents need control yours kids and even for adults pose health risks.

    Marco
    Brazil, SP

    May 31, 2011 at 6:47 am |
  23. Bill

    Everything needs to be regulated because the American people are just to stupid to make their own decisions as to what to put in their own bodies.

    May 31, 2011 at 6:40 am |
  24. Chris

    I'm a 16 year old junior in high school, and energy drinks give us what milk and water don't give us: Energy. Dump loads of homework on me and expect me to get a full 8 hours of sleep? Haha, no.

    May 31, 2011 at 6:39 am |
  25. Keegen

    Our government isn't their to intervene and regulate things like energy drinks; thats a parents job to decide what their child. Us as a civilization needs to stop putting so much into the hands of our government and take some responsibilities ourselves.

    May 31, 2011 at 6:39 am |
  26. Neil T. Egan

    I believe that not only energy drinks should be regulated. But as parents we need to look at everything that our children consume on a daily basis. Energy drinks are a very good start, but look at Mountain Dew, the soft drink it has more caffine then any other normal soft drink, excluding drinks such as JOLT and those other Extremely high Caffine drinks.

    Parents need to not only look at these drinks but need to watch over our childrens, intake of these drinks, they are not healthy for our children. I believe that the are actually determental children and stunt the brain growth.

    Sincerely,
    Neil T. Egan

    May 31, 2011 at 6:32 am |
  27. Spike

    No, they shouldn't be regulated.
    Like alcohol product's has a you must be 21 years of age to drink.
    And Cigarettes (And all tobacco products) is at 18 years of age.
    It should be common sense for the parents to look at the calories, sugar and other ingredients.
    I am a big MONSTER fan, it may or may not keep me awake, but I love the taste. But the thing is, is that I am, at the TARGETED age. Which for most ENERGY DRINK Companies is seen at 15+.

    I say no to the fact it shouldn't be regulated, it shouldn't be a FORCED response. The PARENTS should look for this.

    May 31, 2011 at 6:32 am |
  28. Debbie Raney

    NO!!!!! Regulating what my children drink is my job!!!!! Not the government!!! Seems to me....one of the reasons are country is in the shape it is...is because of regulations!!!

    May 31, 2011 at 6:29 am |
  29. Sharon Bogney

    as much as i agree with the fact that, energy drinks shouldn't be in a child's diet. i still think that the decision should be left for the parents and the children to make. this idea of regulating everything in children's' menu, i don't see it as the best. in fact i believe when you say don't do this that is when they will want to do it.

    May 31, 2011 at 6:26 am |
  30. Jesse Clark

    I don't think they should be! If they are your kids and you don't want them drinking the drinks then don't let them. The kid is your responsibility not the companies who make the drinks. So, if you have a problem with the drink, don't let your kids get ahold of them.

    May 31, 2011 at 6:21 am |
  31. Jamie fritts

    No, from what I have seen saying no, regulating, and restricting things that kids want makes them want it more i.e. fireworks, tobacco, alcohol, drugs. While they are at it how about time restrictions on web time for teens and milage limits for young drivers.

    Jamie
    St. Paul, Mn

    May 31, 2011 at 6:14 am |