American Morning

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October 18th, 2010
08:05 AM ET

"Hello CNN from Everest Base Camp"

Editor’s note: Arctic explorer Eric Larsen has spent the past 15 years of his life traveling to some of the most remote places on earth. He even sent the first tweet ever from the North Pole on Earth Day. Larsen reached the top of the Mt Everest on Friday. He talks to American Morning's Kiran Chetry about his 'Save the Poles' expedition to focus attention on Global Warming.


Filed under: Eric Larsen
September 8th, 2010
12:15 PM ET

Arctic explorer making way to top of Mt. Everest

Editor’s note: Arctic explorer Eric Larsen is trying to make it to the North and South Poles and the summit of Mount Everest in 365 days as part of an effort to raise awareness about climate change. Larsen joined us on American Morning before he set out on his Save the Poles expedition – and just launched the final leg of his journey to Mount Everest. Below is an excerpt from his online journal.

The last suspension bridge before Namche Bazar, on the way to Everest base camp.

The last suspension bridge before Namche Bazar, on the way to Everest base camp.


By Eric Larsen, From EricLarsenExplore.com

I'm not sure how to actually start my updates as I am nearly speechless. None of my previous expeditions have prepared me for my hike to Everest base camp. I have long since run out of adjectives to describe the grandeur and beauty of this place.

I'm trying not to gush, but it's difficult. In only a few days, I'm positive that Tshering has already tired of the unending string of wow's and amazing's that keep coming out of my mouth. This is such a far cry from the landscape of ice and snow of the poles.

We left Lukla two days ago on a winding trail through a steep valley. I am surprised at the lushness of the terrain. Nearly vertical mountain slopes are covered with thick green vegetation. Waterfalls spill downward hundreds of feet starting from such great heights that their source, I can only imagine, must be the clouds themselves.
FULL POST


Filed under: Environment • Eric Larsen
April 23rd, 2010
09:30 AM ET

Arctic explorer arrives at North Pole on Earth Day

Editor’s note: Arctic explorer Eric Larsen is trying to make it to the North and South Poles and the summit of Mount Everest in 365 days as part of an effort to raise awareness about climate change. Larsen joined us on American Morning before he set out on his Save the Poles expedition. On Earth Day, he arrived at the North Pole, the second destination in his global expedition. Below is an excerpt from his online journal.

Antony Jinman, Eric Larsen and Darcy St-Laurent standing at the Geographic North Pole.

Antony Jinman, Eric Larsen and Darcy St-Laurent standing at the Geographic North Pole.

By Eric Larsen
From EricLarsenExplore.com

Achieving the North Pole on Earth Day is not only the realization of a dream but also a reinforcement of a basic philosophy. The quality of our lives is directly linked to the air we breathe and the water we drink. At the North Pole, lines of longitude begin, grow and extend until they reach everyone one the entire planet. In spite of its remoteness, this is the one place that connects us all.

Nearly four months ago, I was at the opposite end of the world, the South Pole (another of Earth's connecting points). Today, the North Pole. In another four months, the summit of Mt. Everest. Standing here now is the culmination of three and a half years of preparation and planning as well as the efforts of many people. While I may be personally involved in these adventures, the Save the Poles expedition is not about me. My importance in any of this stems only in my ability to share my experiences with others.

On this expedition, we often traveled within a narrow margin of safety. We had limited resources and had to conserve and meter food and fuel. There is no question that now, the 21st century, we need to use resources to ensure our health and survival. But which resources we use, how we use them (and in what quantities) and if they are renewable are cornerstone to preserving our planet for future generations. Ultimately, when we view ourselves part of a whole, we can begin to understand how our actions affect other people and the planet.

After all, we are all explorers in one fashion or another, but the job of explorers in the 21st century is not to conquer but to protect. Read more

Audio podcast: Larsen and his team describe their journey to the North Pole


Filed under: Environment • Eric Larsen
March 11th, 2010
01:00 PM ET

Arctic explorer headed for North Pole

Editor’s note: Arctic explorer Eric Larsen is trying to make it to the North and South Poles and the summit of Mount Everest in 365 days as part of an effort to raise awareness about climate change. Larsen joined us on American Morning before he set out on his Save the Poles expedition – and just launched the second leg of his journey to the North Pole. Below is an excerpt from his online journal.

Larsen’s crew trekking towards the North Pole. Courtesy: Eric Larsen

Larsen’s crew trekking towards the North Pole. Courtesy: Eric Larsen

By Eric Larsen, From EricLarsenExplore.com

Is the ice more beautiful because, for us here, it is dangerous and potentially deadly? Or is it beautiful because so few people have seen this place? Perhaps, its the fact that we are looking at something that may be gone in the future. Or does beauty lie just by existing?

We continue to be astounded by the forms and variety of ice here. Each day has seen a slight change in conditions. Today, we were pleased to find harder patches of snow as well as fewer pressure ridges; however, we are presently camped among some of the biggest pressure we've seen yet.

One surprise was finding a nearly kilometer wide lead in the early afternoon. While we regularly encounter leads, this was the first that was relatively new. Stepping gingerly, we watched as the ice bowed underneath our Atlas snowshoes and sent ripples forward. We decided to skirt the thinest sections. Read the full story »


Filed under: Environment • Eric Larsen
January 12th, 2010
12:47 PM ET

Explorer raises awareness – Tries to keep carbon footprint in-check

Editor’s note: Arctic explorer Eric Larsen is trying to make it to the North and South Poles and the summit of Mount Everest in 365 days as part of an effort to raise awareness about climate change. Larsen joined us on American Morning before he set out on his Save the Poles expedition – and completed the first leg of his journey when he reached the South Pole earlier this month. Below is an excerpt from his online journal.

Larsen’s crew trekking through Antarctica. Courtesy: Eric Larsen

Larsen’s crew trekking through Antarctica. Courtesy: Eric Larsen

By Eric Larsen, From EricLarsenExplore.com

One of the things that people always ask me is about the impact of air travel on the environment. I for one, travel a lot by air for sponsorship meetings and presentations. It is important to point out the paradoxes in one's own behavior (and then change them)…

There is no question that my expeditions (vacations and every day actions) have an effect on the amount of carbon that enters the atmosphere. However, I like everyone else, can do my part to reduce travel, save energy, buy carbon offsets and all the other little steps that can add up to make big change.

Read the full story »


Filed under: Environment • Eric Larsen
January 8th, 2010
01:00 PM ET

Explorer reaches South Pole

Editor’s note: Arctic explorer Eric Larsen is trying to make it to the North and South Poles and the summit of Mount Everest in 365 days as part of an effort to raise awareness about climate change. Larsen joined us on American Morning before he set out on his Save the Poles expedition. Below is an excerpt from his online journal.

Larsen and his team reach the South Pole. Courtesy: Eric Larsen

Larsen and his team reach the South Pole. Courtesy: Eric Larsen

By Eric Larsen
From EricLarsenExplore.com

Day 47: The Pole

We did it!

Remember, it's cool to be cold. Save the Poles. Save the planet.

Read the full story »


Filed under: Environment • Eric Larsen
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