American Morning

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December 28th, 2011
09:03 AM ET

Kim Jong Il's funeral a show of stability? CSIS's Victor Cha on what can be learned from the procession

North Korea is painting a picture of power and stability this morning as the world watches the funeral procession for Kim Jong Il.

Thousands of hysterical mourners lined the streets of the capital in the snow to say farewell to the former dictator. His son Kim Jong Un - the hand-picked successor to North Korea - walked alongside the hearse with thousands of soldiers marching in step right behind him.

This morning on American Morning, senior advisor and Korea Chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies Victor Cha talks about whether today's events reveal anything about the leadership transition and why so many who study North Korea are pessimistic about the country's future.


Filed under: North Korea
December 19th, 2011
12:31 PM ET

Future of North Korea uncertain after Kim Jong-il's passing

Kim Jong-il gave himself the nickname "dear leader,"  but most will remember him as an oppressive ruler who controlled the nation for seventeen years through fear and intimidation. Now that he is gone, the future of North Korea and its nuclear weapons remains uncertain.

Ali Velshi sits down with Ambassador Young-Mok Kim, Consul General of the Republic of Korea in New York, to explain what concerns South Koreans have about a post-Kim North Korea.


Filed under: North Korea
December 19th, 2011
12:30 PM ET

What's next for North Korea after Kim Jong-il? James Rubin weighs in

This morning, North Korea state television reported that Kim Jong-il has died.  North Koreans are being urged to follow Kim Jong-il's son, Kim Jung Un, as their new leader.

However, very little is known about Kim Jung Un, leading many world leaders to worry about whether he can maintain control of the reclusive nation and its nuclear program.

Today on American Morning, Alina Cho and Ali Velshi talk with James Rubin, former U.S. Assistant Secretary of State, about what the death of Kim Jong-il means for the future of North Korea.


Filed under: North Korea
December 19th, 2011
12:26 PM ET

North Koreans urged to follow Kim Jong Un

Kim Jong-il's passing leaves a temporary power vacuum in North Korea.  North Koreans are being urged to follow Kim Jong-il's son, Kim Jong Un, about whom little is known.  However, some say the young and inexperienced Kim Jong Un may serve as little more than a puppet.

Today on American Morning, Alina Cho talks with Bill Richardson, former U.S. ambassador to the U.N., about what the world can expect from North Korea under the rule of Kim Jong Un.


Filed under: North Korea
December 19th, 2011
12:25 PM ET

What does the passing of Kim Jong-il mean for regional stability?

The passing of Kim Jong-il marks the demise of one of the world's most ruthless dictators.  Though some world leaders might see this as a moment to celebrate, others are more worried that Jong-il's death could provoke regional instability.  Indeed, little is known about Kim Jong-il's designated successor, his young son Kim Jong Un.

Ali Velshi talks with Victor Cha, senior adviser and Korea chair at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, about what Kim Jong-il's passing could mean for the Asian region.


Filed under: North Korea
December 19th, 2011
10:16 AM ET

North Korea's Kim Jong-il dies

Enigmatic North Korean leader Kim Jong-il has died, state television reported Monday.  A North Korean TV broadcaster said the 69-year-old leader died Saturday due to "overwork" while "dedicating his life to the people."

North Korea's official KCNA news agency said Kim suffered "great mental and physical strain" while on a train. Kim, who had been treated for "cardiac and cerebrovascular diseases for a long period," suffered a heart attack on Saturday and couldn't be saved despite the use of "every possible first-aid measure," according to the agency.

Ali Velshi talks to Jim Walsh, International Security Analyst at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, to discuss what's next for North Korea after Kim's death.


Filed under: North Korea
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