American Morning

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March 15th, 2010
08:00 AM ET

Duncan: 'No Child' lowered school standards

(CNN) – President Obama plans to change the way we evaluate the performance of our nation's public schools. That means the "No Child Left Behind Act" is in for an overhaul.

Today, the White House will send a new set of guidelines to Congress. Education Secretary Arne Duncan joined us on Monday's American Morning, along with CNN education contributor Steve Perry.


Filed under: Education
March 15th, 2010
07:00 AM ET

Woman becomes high school football coach

(CNN) – By now you might have heard of Natalie Randolph, a woman living a dream that many would have called impossible.

Her father wouldn't let her play football in high school, so she later played in a women's league. And now she's the coach at a high school in Washington, D.C. Our Carol Costello sat down with her to talk about her new role.


Filed under: Sports • U.S.
March 15th, 2010
06:00 AM ET

'Clock is ticking' on Wall Street reform, Dodd says

[cnn-photo-caption image= http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/images/03/13/t1main.dodd.gi.jpg caption="Senate Banking chief Christopher Dodd is expected Monday to release a draft bill of regulatory changes aimed at warding off collapses in the financial system."]

WASHINGTON (CNNMoney.com) - The head of a key banking panel is expected Monday to release a draft bill of sweeping regulatory changes aimed at warding off future collapses in the financial system.

While much of the attention has focused on battles over the creation of a new consumer regulator to ensure consumers get a fair shake with mortgages and credit cards, the final draft is expected to address other areas, including some lawmakers generally agree about.

Senate Banking chief Christopher Dodd, D-Conn., said Thursday that the "single most important thing we do in this bill" will be creating a new mechanism to prevent firms from becoming so big that their failure would threaten the entire financial system, spurring another universally hated $700 billion Troubled Asset Relief Program.

Also expected in the bill: New requirements for banks and financial firms to strengthen their capital cushions and new rules pushing some complex financial products to be traded on clearinghouses, instead of in the shadows as is currently done. FULL STORY


Filed under: Business
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