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May 5th, 2010
12:00 PM ET

DHS changing no-fly list policy after Times Square plot

[cnn-photo-caption image= http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/images/05/05/shahzad.3.art.jpg caption="Faisal Shahzad, 30, was arrested Monday night in connection with a car bomb parked in New York's Times Square."]

(CNN) – The Department of Homeland Security is changing its no-fly list update policies to prevent a repeat of what happened Monday, when the suspect in the Times Square attempted bombing was allowed to board a plane despite his name being on the no-fly list, a DHS official told CNN Wednesday.

The official said the Transportation Security Administration will require airlines to check the no-fly list within two hours of being electronically notified of additions or changes. Previously, airlines were required to re-check the list within 24 hours.

Faisal Shahzad, who has been charged in connection with the attempted bombing in Times Square, was able to board Emirates Flight 202 late Monday despite being put on a no-fly list earlier in the day. He made his reservation by phone as he drove to the airport just hours before the flight, investigators said. When he paid for his ticket in cash at the ticket counter, the airline had not refreshed its information so his name did not raise any red flags, a senior counterterrorism official told CNN.

Updates | Timeline | Full Coverage | How he made the bomb Video


Filed under: Terrorism • U.S.
soundoff (4 Responses)
  1. David

    Maybe we have grown accustomed to only meeting the standard of the day. Perhaps if more people/organizations exceeded those standards, or if the bar was raised and continually reevaluated, we could limit potential problems in the future.

    May 6, 2010 at 9:28 am |
  2. Sunni Johnson

    The simple solution would be to use live lists on their computer instead of printing out a list once a day or week. Then it is as current as possible. Maybe we should start using our fingerprints instead of drivers license to enter airports. This would offer both security and opportunity to get everyones id without tampering with documentation.

    May 6, 2010 at 9:07 am |
  3. Barbara Ross

    Well that makes a lot of sense. What's the use of a no-fly list if nobody checks it in a timely fashion?

    May 5, 2010 at 12:41 pm |
  4. howie

    excellent to see they still have the "Bush Reactive" mentality instead of lets say being a tee bit intuitive and proactive. 10 years post 9-11 and we've learned nothing but knee-jerk reactions... bravo!!!

    May 5, 2010 at 12:17 pm |