American Morning

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May 25th, 2010
09:00 AM ET

The Cost of College: Dream school, nightmare debt

Editor's Note: A new study suggests job prospects for this year's college graduates have improved slightly. That's a little bit of good news for students who now have to pay for that education. This week, our Alina Cho is looking into "The Cost of College." Today, she has the story of one young man who regrets his decision to go to a top-tier university.

(CNN) – For high school salutatorian Ryan Durosky, there was no question that he would go to his dream school, New York University. It's a name-brand school, but it cost him. Now, he's nearly $300,000 in debt, and he's not alone.

To be clear, Ryan does not blame NYU for his college debt, he blames himself for making the choice, and he believes the economic downturn played a role. He certainly did not expect to be laid off, especially so soon after graduation.

NYU tells CNN its advice for prospective students is to "plan ahead." College is an investment and people need to save for it. Also, they say, if you're in default on your student loans you should contact the lender and NYU's career center for help.


Filed under: Cost of College • Education
May 25th, 2010
08:30 AM ET

Commentary: Cost of college damaging, financially & mentally

Editor's Note: This week, our Alina Cho is looking into "The Cost of College." Today, she has the story of one young man who regrets his decision to go to a top-tier university. For Ryan Durosky, there was no question that he would go to his dream school, New York University. Now, he's nearly $300,000 in debt, and he's not alone. Below is a commentary he wrote for CNN about his experiences.

By Ryan Durosky
Special to CNN

I graduated on the precipice of one of the worst economic collapses in American history. Living in NYC, I was at the center of this maelstrom. Lucky for me, I chose not to work in the financial services industry. Friends (and friends of friends) recently hired by investment banking powerhouses were told to leave and so the layoff rate began to mirror the DOW’s plunging numbers. But I was safe. Far removed from the volatility of the financial markets, I could watch the DOW plunge 700 points in one day and know that I still had a job. I, and countless others didn’t know that these events would have far-reaching effects. Namely, my job wasn’t as safe as I thought it was.

My salary was modest and I had average health and dental insurance. By the summer of 2008, I was struggling to pay down my $1,125/month rent while living in one of the most expensive cities in the world. Yes, I had roommates to share the expenses with but there was plenty of rent due to go around. Add to that overdue monthly credit card bills (credit that I needed to get through college), unpaid hospital bills, and...well you get the picture, but I was on my own and that was all that mattered for the time being. College was over, this was ‘reality.’

FULL POST


Filed under: Cost of College • Education
May 25th, 2010
08:00 AM ET

Motorcyclist faces jail for YouTube video of traffic stop

By Carol Costello, CNN

(CNN) – The American Civil Liberties Union is calling the case surrounding Maryland’s Anthony Graber an "extremely dangerous act of police retaliation." One that could send Graber to prison for five years.

It boils down to this: do you have the right to use your personal camera to record audio and video of someone, in this case a police officer, without his consent? What if he asks you to stop recording him? What if you don't? And, what if you then posted the recording on YouTube?

Last month, a Maryland State Trooper, in plain clothes, and driving an unmarked car, stopped Graber’s motorcycle. Police say he was driving 100 mph and “doing wheelies” on I-95 in Harford County, Maryland.

The trooper approached Graber, gun drawn. After five seconds, the officer identified himself as a police officer and put his gun away. He cited Graber for traffic violations and drove away.

Here’s where the story gets complicated.

FULL POST


Filed under: Controversy • Justice
May 25th, 2010
07:00 AM ET

Gulf Coast fisheries shut by oil spill

(CNN) – Today is day 36 of the oil spill in the Gulf. Twenty percent of the fisheries in the region have now been shut down. The Commerce Department is freeing up federal help by declaring a fisheries disaster. 150 miles of Gulf coast shoreline are now impacted by the spill. Birds and fish are dying, and jobs are vanishing. And as our Rob Marciano reports, it's getting very difficult for the locals to just sit back and watch what's happening.

Read more: Patience runs thin as BP preps untested maneuver


Filed under: Business • Environment • Gulf Oil Spill
May 25th, 2010
05:58 AM ET

LIVE Blog: Chat with us during the show

Editor's Note: Welcome to American Morning's LIVE Blog where you can discuss the "most news in the morning" with us each and every day. Join the live chat during the program by adding your comments below. It's your chance to share your thoughts on the day's headlines. Keep in mind, you have a better chance of having your comment get past our moderators if you follow our rules: 1) Keep it brief 2) No writing in ALL CAPS 3) Use your real name (first name only is fine) 4) No links 5) Watch your language (that includes $#&*).

[cnn-photo-caption image= http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/US/05/25/gulf.oil.spill/t1main2.jpg caption="Oil company BP is expected to brief reporters Tuesday morning about its next attempt to contain the gushing oil in the Gulf of Mexico - a maneuver called "top kill.""]

Patience runs thin as BP preps untested maneuver

(CNN) – Oil company BP is expected to brief reporters Tuesday morning about its next attempt to contain the gushing oil in the Gulf of Mexico - a maneuver called "top kill" that it plans to implement the following day.

All previous attempts by the company to cap the spill have failed, and BP CEO Tony Hayward said the "top kill" maneuver will have a 60 to 70 percent chance of success when it is put in place as early as Wednesday morning.

The procedure has successfully worked on above-ground oil wells in the Middle East, but has never been tested 5,000 feet underwater.

Public patience was wearing thin 36 days into the spill, as oil sloshed ashore on Louisiana's barrier islands and seeped into marshes around the mouth of the Mississippi River. Read more

The Cost of College: Dream school, nightmare of debt

A new study suggests job prospects for this year's college graduates have improved slightly. That's a little bit of good news for students who now have to pay for that education. This week, our Alina Cho is looking into "The Cost of College." Today, she has the story of one young man who regrets his decision to go to a top-tier university.

Sound off: We want to hear from you this morning. Add your comments to the LIVE Blog below and we'll read some of them on the show.


Filed under: LIVE Blog • Top Stories
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